High-Tech Crime Investigations

Nearly every crime today leaves a digital footprint—whether it’s someone posting images of child exploitation on the Internet, or a group of kids taking pictures with their cell phones of the house they just vandalized. The digital trail is there and it’s evidence that investigators can use to build a case.

At SEARCH, we break down high-tech crime investigating into useful pieces for you. 

  • If you’re at a crime scene and find a running computer, you need to know the procedure for securing that computer in order to get the most and best data from it.
  • If you’re working a gang investigation, you may need to comb social networking sites to find associates and connections to your suspect.
  • If you’re lucky enough to get your hands on a cell phone that was left behind at a crime scene, you need to know how to get the data out of that phone and into your report.

Our training courses are:

  • Convenient
  • Targeted
  • Hands-on

Let our team of high-tech crime training specialists help you today! Select from our Instructor-Led Training or our Modular Course and Conference Blocks.

conference-blockModular Course and Conference Blocks

In addition to our full-length courses, we can tailor our curriculum into shorter, condensed versions that fit into your meeting or conference agenda needs. Take a look at all of our individual course blocks and let us know how we can make a difference to your audience.
Learn More

Karen Lissy

Ms. Karen Lissy is a Justice Information Services Specialist for the Law and Policy Program of SEARCH, The National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics. In this position, she provides assistance to state and local justice and public safety agencies to collect, curate, and use National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data and computerized criminal history record (CCH/CHRI) information for policy analysis and development.

She also guides justice and related organizations in how to craft and implement laws, policies, practices, and technology applications to effectively collect and use CCH and related justice/public safety data; address legal, policy, and regulatory issues associated with CCH data; better manage and operate criminal justice information and identification systems; and develop security and privacy policies that protect justice information sharing systems.

Ms. Lissy has nearly two decades of research and data analysis experience, having led projects and tasks in support of two agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs (the Bureau of Justice Statistics and National Institute of Justice), as well as the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, and multiple foundations, including Ford, Annie E. Casey, and Hewlett. Prior to joining SEARCH in October 2020, Ms. Lissy served as a Social Science Researcher at RTI International, as a regional Crime Analyst for the Redmond (WA) Police Department, and as Director of a research program with the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis. Beginning in 2012, Ms. Lissy’s work has focused on improving data in law enforcement to answer policy questions and improve community/police relations.

Ms. Lissy earned a Bachelor’s degree in Public Policy from Duke University, and a Master’s in Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

×