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10Aug2016

SEARCH high-tech crime training team offers workshops and labs at 2016 Crimes Against Children Conference in Dallas

By SEARCH

SEARCH’s High-Tech Crime Training Services team is in Dallas, Texas, this week, presenting workshops and hands-on computer laboratory sessions at the 2016 Crimes Against Children Conference.

The annual event, now in its 28th year, is cosponsored by the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center and the Dallas Police Department. It provides training to professionals involved in investigations, prosecution, and treatment of crimes against children, particularly involving technology and Internet-related crime.

According to conference officials, the 2016 event has drawn an all-time high attendance of 4,200 participants from all 50 states and 30 countries from the fields of law enforcement, child protective services, social work, children’s advocacy, therapy, and medicine—all of whom work directly with child victims of crime.

SEARCH is a Training Partner at the event, held August 8–11, and is presenting these computer labs and workshop lectures, some of which were limited to law enforcement and prosecution agency personnel:

  • Introduction to the Darknet: As the debate over digital privacy rages in the media and the courts, many who use technology (include people who commit criminal offenses) have found ways to obscure their online activity. The TOR network is often used as a bastion where offenders can operate in the open with little fear of law enforcement interdiction. This lab introduces students to the terminology employed in anonymized browsing, how to access the TOR network, and how to better understand the challenges of investigating crimes on the Darknet.
  • Introduction to Digital Triage with WinFE: The Windows Forensic Environment (WinFE) is a bootable forensic environment that enables investigators to operate in a traditional Windows environment and run their preview tools against a suspect computer. Students use the skills and software necessary to create a WinFE image, which can be booted by either CD or USB device, and practice booting a “suspect computer” with their WinFE and run preview tools.
  • Computer Forensics for Prosecutors: Digital evidence is pervasive in today’s criminal trials, making it imperative that prosecutors understand the intricacies of computer forensics in order to win cases. This lab addresses the fundamentals of computer forensics, and discusses the many forensic artifacts that are useful to prove up a variety of criminal charges. Students use forensic tools to recover evidence from a digital device.
  • Introduction to Open Source Digital Forensics: Autopsy® is an automated environment that has the core analysis features needed by law enforcement to conduct an investigation of digital media, such as hard drives, memory cards, or mobile devices. The open source software is available for free. Students receive an introduction to the software and how they can use it during their investigations to assist with the recovery of digital evidence.
  • Facebook: Advanced Searching and Saving Techniques: Facebook is the largest worldwide social media website and contains a substantial amount of potential investigative information. This session teaches students three distinct methods to search Facebook to retrieve investigative material.
  • Life Beyond Facebook: Other Social Media Searches: This computer lab addresses techniques students can use to search social media sites, other than Facebook, to find evidence and content of investigative value. These include Twitter, Instagram, YikYak and Whisper.

  • Digital Evidence in Child Abuse Prosecutions: This workshop discusses strategies and suggestions for investigating and prosecuting child abuse cases by exploiting every advantage found in the digital “paper trail” that offenders leave behind. It also addresses tips for bolstering the strength of the state’s case in the investigative stage, at trial, and on appeal; key issues in drafting search warrants for digital evidence; and steps to follow to ensure compliance with federal/state Electronic Communications Privacy Acts.
  • The Darknet and Emerging Technologies: Where are Teens Going and Offenders Following? Darknet is a computer network used primarily for illegal peer-to-peer file sharing. This workshop teaches students how the Darknet works and how potential criminal activity facilitated on the Darknet is crucial to investigating and prosecuting child exploitation cases. It also demonstrates several new applications for mobile devices that are popular with teenagers, including those that secretly store photos, videos, and sexts
  • Normal to be Normal: An Absence of Findings Does Not Mean the Absence of Abuse: In this workshop, SEARCH staff Justin Fitzsimmons (a former prosecutor) describes strategies and techniques for court preparation when a case of suspected child sexual abuse with a “normal” exam is being presented for civil hearing or criminal trial.
  • Clash of the Medical Experts: Alternative Theories in Abusive Head Trauma: This workshop addresses a case example of abusive head trauma that highlights the need for a thorough medical evaluation and diligent investigation. SEARCH staff presents strategies and techniques for court preparation and courtroom presentation of information from the witnesses for both the prosecution and defense.
  • Corroboration: The Key to a Strong Child Exploitation Case: Supporting a child’s disclosure through corroborative evidence is essential in child abuse investigations and prosecutions. This presentation covers the potential areas to discover corroborative evidence, and explains the importance of technology-based corroboration. It includes detailed examples of how statements made during the disclosure leads to corroborative evidence.

At the 2016 Crimes Against Children Conference in Dallas, Texas, SEARCH High-Tech Crime Training Services staff (from left) Lauren Wagner and Justin Fitzsimmons accept an award of appreciation from Bill Walsh, conference coordinator, Dallas Police Department (ret.), and Lynn Davis, President and CEO of the Dallas Children's Advocacy Center. The Dallas PD and CAC cosponsor the annual event.

At the 2016 Crimes Against Children Conference in Dallas, Texas, SEARCH High-Tech Crime Training Services staff (from left) Lauren Wagner and Justin Fitzsimmons accept an award of appreciation from Bill Walsh, conference coordinator, Dallas Police Department (ret.), and Lynn Davis, President and CEO of the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center. The Dallas PD and CAC cosponsor the annual event.

SEARCH High-Tech Crime Training Services Director Tim Lott provides a workshop on "Introduction to the Darknet" to attendees of the 2016 Crimes Against Children Conference.

SEARCH High-Tech Crime Training Services Director Tim Lott provides a workshop on “Introduction to the Darknet” to attendees of the 2016 Crimes Against Children Conference.

Justin Fitzsimmons, Program Manager of SEARCH High-Tech Crime Training Services, presents a workshop on the Darknet and Emerging Technologies at the 2016 Crimes Against Children Conference. Like many of SEARCH’s computer labs and workshops, the session was filled to capacity.

Justin Fitzsimmons, Program Manager of SEARCH High-Tech Crime Training Services, presents a workshop on the Darknet and Emerging Technologies at the 2016 Crimes Against Children Conference. Like many of SEARCH’s computer labs and workshops, the session was filled to capacity.

SEARCH High-Tech Crime Training Services staff presenting at the 2016 CACC are:

Tim Lott, Director, High-Tech Crime Training Services

Tim Lott
Director, High-Tech Crime Training Services

Justin Fitzsimmons, Program Manager, High-Tech Crime Training Services

Justin Fitzsimmons
Program Manager, High-Tech Crime Training Services

Dean Chatfield, High-Tech Crime Training Specialist

Dean Chatfield
High-Tech Crime Training Specialist

Lauren Wagner, High-Tech Crime Training Specialist

Lauren Wagner
High-Tech Crime Training Specialist

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